August 2015


January Means Jumbo Bones at Bair’s

January Means Jumbo Bones at Bair’s— With the BTT Team   Understanding bonefish behavior—where they roam, when they spawn, and how and what they eat—enhances our angling education, making us more effective. On January 21-27, 2016, take advantage of an exclusive Flyfishing/learning opportunity by joining Nervous Waters and our friends at the Bonefish & Tarpon Trust for 6 nights and 5 days at Bair’s Lodge, on South Andros Island.   During that timeframe, BTT scientists will be researching bonefish, working out of Bair’s. In addition to the scientists, there are 7 spots open for anglers. It’s your choice how much you’d like to participate in research, observe research, or just fish with our experienced guides for big winter bones on the expansive flats of South Andros.   There are currently 7 open spots. Cost is $4,550 + $170 VAT per person, double occupancy (travel to/from South Andros, gratuities not included).   Research Activities Include: –    Using seine nets to capture bonefish for tagging with dart and acoustic tags, while collecting fin clips for the genetics project. –    Tracking bonefish with acoustic receivers at a newly identified spawning site (there will be some overnight tracking as well). –    Deploying acoustic receivers around South Andros to track bonefish spawning migrations. –    Experiments to hatch fertilized bonefish eggs at the study site.   Below is a video showcasing some of the work that BTT has done on Andros on previous research trips.   Contact us today to learn more.

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Bonefishing Report – May 2015

Bair’s Lodge – Bonefishing Report May 2015. By Doug and Sue Vigue South Andros weather during May was outstanding overall. Light winds and bright sunny days. The guests enjoyed the conditions and caught many fish. As the month progressed, the warm temperatures in the afternoon had a tendency to get a bit too warm and the bonefish moved off the flats into deeper water. Anglers and guides both reported seeing and hooking many large bonefish over 10 lbs but few of these were actually brought to the net. Ah, maybe that is why these fish are so big! As the water has warmed up, tarpon and permit have also been spotted more frequently. A couple of anglers hooked up to tarpon but after a few jumps the tarpon through the hook. Overall it was an outstanding fishing season. Fishing was great all season long. Personally I can’t say that a particular month was better than the others. Every month large fish were caught and all the anglers caught plenty of fish all season long. Tight Lines Doug and Sue Vigue Bair’s Lodge managers

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Bair’s March FISHING REPORT

Bair’s Lodge – Bonefishing Report March 2015. The fishing in March was classic South Andros.  The weather settled in to its traditional patterns.  We had partly cloudy to clear skies with moderate winds on most days and a few northern fronts that came through during the month. Overall, fishing was quite good. A day or so after the fronts came through the weather and fishing improved greatly. Anglers reported 8 to 20 fish landed from most boats each day. And in that number there were usually 2 to 3 fish over five pounds.  Most boats also reported multiple sightings of big fish over 10 pounds each day. During the month it seemed that larger fish over 10 lbs were hooked and a couple were landed. March is considered to be one of the best months to visit Bair’s Lodge, and it lived up to the billing this year. Best regards,Sue and Doug Vigue

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Bair’s Lodge – Bonefishing Report

Posted on February 22, 2015 by Nervous Waters Bonefishing Report Fall Fishing Summary – By Ray and Ann Shewnack Fall fishing in So. Andros is truly a special time of year. While most fly fishing anglers are chasing brown trout on the legendary waters of the Western United States, Anglers who are in the know are coming to So. Andros. The fishing Lodges here have been closed down for the past 4 months for hurricane season leaving the bone fish unmolested and happy. The weather in So. Andros in the fall starts to cool off with highs in the low to mid 80’s. Bairs lodge opens mid October and anglers are treated to eager bone fish tailing on the flats that have not seen an angler since June. It is amazing to hear the stories of anglers occasionally making a bad cast spooking a small school of bone fish and then having that same group of fish eat another well presented fly seconds later. This is what fishing in So Andros is all about in the fall. Tight Lines, Doug and Sue Bair’s Lodge Managers For more Fishing Report click HERE

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Bonefishing Reports

Posted on February 13, 2015 by Nervous Waters BAIRS LODGE Fall Fishing Summary Fall fishing at South Andros was a special time. While most fly-fishers are chasing brown trout on the legendary waters of the Western United States, anglers in the know are coming here. Why? Because most lodge operations have been closed for the past 4 months leaving the bonefish unmolested, happy, and hungry. It’s amazing to hear the stories of anglers occasionally making a bad cast, spooking a small school of bones, and then having that same group eat another well presented fly seconds later. Current Conditions Weather has been mild with temperatures in the low 70s. With occasional northern fronts passing through the island dropping temperatures into the upper 60s. Fishing continues to be outstanding with larger fish appearing from the ocean depths to cruise along the flats to feed. Bonefish & Tarpon Trust biologists just spent 4 days netting and tagging fish last week. They tagged over 1,100 bonefish. The largest school that they netted at one time was over 600 fish! They are finding the fish population to be very healthy. Within the schools that they netted, they found all sizes of fish: from 1 ponders to fish well over 10 pounds! Larger fish being seen and caught by our guest is the norm here during January and February. ABACO LODGE Fall Fishing Summary Fall 2014 was great in Abaco! Lodge guests enjoyed an abundance of nice sized bonefish, with an especially notable 10-pounder in November by guest Dick Pitini and lodge guide Travis Sands. Congratulations again you guys!! Barracuda have been actively cruising the flats, so each boat has been armed with the right gear to hook up with those toothy critters. Cudas are lightning-fast ambush predators that are incredibly fun to catch! Fall is one of the very best times to be in Abaco, especially for our chilly friends from the […]

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Bair’s Lodge – Proud host of Buccaneers and Bones

Posted on February 13, 2015 by Nervous Waters Nervous Waters is once again proud to be associated with the Outdoor Channel series, Buccaneers and Bones. The popular program brings together some of the world’s most noted entertainers, anglers, and conservationists. This season they’ll be at Bair’s Lodge on South Andros! Read more for details and for current bonefishing. The Buccaneers are back, and this time they’ve invited a few new friends such as late night talk show host Jimmy Kimmel and entertainer Jim Belushi. In addition, join musician Huey Lewis, Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard, author Tom McGuane, and angling legend Lefty Kreh on South Andros Island in the Bahamas. It’s a mix of great bonefishing action and general shenanigans on and off the water as this group learns how to protect and preserve an important species for future generations. See more at OurDoor Channel 

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What Guides Say: 6 simple axioms for getting ahead in the salt (Part II)

[For more from this series, please see Part I—from January 23] Because guides possess wisdoms acquired during a lifetime on the water, it pays for us to listen. Here’s what the good ones have to say.   “MANAGE YOUR MESS.” In the grand scheme of flats fishing, mismanaged line leads to a lot of blown fish. When your guide powers the skiff down and steps onto the platform, it’s time for you to ready your line—properly. Start by stripping a comfortable amount off the reel and onto the deck at your feet—no more than what you can cast accurately. Fifty to seventy-five feet should do it. Next step, clear the line by casting it all ahead of the skiff. Now, retrieve the line and deposit it at your feet (or onto a stripping mat/into a basket). It’ll be coiled from the bottom up, making it less likely to tangle on the way back out. “RESPECT THE RESOURCE, DUDE.” Whether we like it or not, there is a mortality statistic attached to our saltwater angling. As stewards of these habitats, good guides do not want to see the resource suffer via your moronic fish-handling practices. Aid a fish’s survival with these simple catch-and-release maxims: Play the fish quickly, and not to exhaustion. Limit its time out of the water (photograph the fish in the water). And revive a fish long enough so it can swim away upright and happy. Fishing barbless hooks helps expedite the release process. “ENJOY BEER TIME.” For green saltwater anglers, the time between the guide spotting an incoming fish—“10 o’clock, 70 feet ”—and the moment you make your cast can be a shitshow. The best piece of advice I ever received from the dude bellowing orders from the stern was to just… “Relax, man.” Heed your guide’s […]

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What Guides Say: 6 simple axioms for getting ahead in the salt (Part I)

When the doctor says nix the smokes and dump twelve pounds, you trust he has your best interests in mind. And when your saltwater guide says your “non-conventional” cast has you failing to connect at 30 feet out, you should also conclude the same. Why? Because missing that perfect opportunity at a double-digit bonefish just might kill you. That’s why. All joking aside, I’ve been lucky enough to work, fish, and speak candidly with some incredible fishing guides over the years. From the renowned, like Steve Huff in the Keys or Marty Sawyer on Abaco, to the massive personalities we often meet in the Caribbean, the one consistency is that they’re all different. But they all share a common trait, too: that is, an awesome ability to put clients on fish no matter what the circumstances. Because guides possess wisdoms acquired during a lifetime on the water, it pays for us to listen. Here’s what the good ones have to say. 1) “TALK TO ME, WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER.” Saltwater fisheries are complex and present challenges that average anglers can’t easily solve. That’s why the best independent saltwater guides can charge upwards of $600 bucks a day. They’ve earned it learning the affects of specific tides on specific flats during specific seasons when specific species are prevalent—and sharing with us those specificities. With all that accumulated knowledge, guides can sometimes come across as arrogant, pushy, and even upset and disappointed. It’s in their nature to want you to succeed, so do not take their frustrations personally. If you blow a fish, don’t fret; there are plenty more to blow as the day unfolds. But do take the time to replay the missed opportunities with your guide. What could you have done differently: Was the retrieve too fast? Was the fly […]

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Bob Gino had left his comments about Bair’s.

Posted on December 23, 2014 by Nervous Waters After his visit to Bair´s Lodge, in South Andros, Bob says: “I like to ffer constructive criticism to the places I visit that I plan on returning to, as I plan to come here again, but have nothing to offer in theway improving the operation. The managers and staff are friendly and attentive, food is delicious and healthy and the accommodations are very clean and comfortable, but having fly fished in the salt many time I was so impressed with the guides. Their attitudes are the best I’ve seen. Salt water fly fishing is more difficult than most people know and typically salt guides have little patience for the seasoned novice. This is a fishing trip after all and these guys can make or break the experience. I fished with Leslie, Gary and Ron, and to a man, great guys.  Also the fishing is great, large bones and plenty of them!”   Discover Bair’s Lodge

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