December 2018


Teamworking a Pool

By Stephan Dombaj   The headline “Teamworking” may come as a surprise to some readers. Fishing tends to blur the lines between recreational joy and the diehard reality of numbers. Some of us count fish, others like to record the length and weight of prize catches. And really, there’s nothing wrong with chasing more and bigger fish.   The late Mel Krieger referred to fly fishing as, “solitude without loneliness.” And no coincidence, he coined that phrase on the Rio Grande, a river that fueled his endless pursuit till the end. This solitude we’re all seeking may also be the reason why we develop a one-man-army attitude when we’re on the water. But inevitably you’ll find times when you’re not alone. And this is when working together can really pay off.   The idea of claiming team rewards seems odd, even to myself. But hear me out. If I’m fishing with other anglers, I always pay attention to the strongest rod in the group. That’s because I’m always up for a lesson. And that’s the beauty of this game: there’s always something to learn. Sea trout and Atlantic salmon are migratory fish with minds of their own. Their behavior is dynamic and their moods are ever changing. So it can help to have two “thinking” rods on the same piece of water, testing different theories and experimenting with different approaches.   Let’s assume you have teamed up with a capable rod. You happen to be fishing behind him or her, covering the same water. Whether the rod in front of you catches a ton of fish or nil doesn’t matter. But would you cover the same water with the same line and the same fly again? Hoping for the same or a better result? You shouldn’t.   Teamworking a pool […]

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PIRA LODGE: ARGENTINA

A Week in the Corrientes Marshland Hunting Golden Dorado at Pira Lodge Pursuing the elusive salminus brasiliensis, the golden dorado, at Pira Lodge in Northern Argentina is an experience that expertly blends unapologetically wild environments with a level of luxury and comfort that is near impossible to find at a fishing lodge Article by Kathryn Fensterstock Read the article

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Gearing up for world’s end

Tierra del Fuego means land of fire. But “land of wind”, as many traveling anglers know, would be an equally appropriate title for this breathtaking part of the world. When it chooses to blow hard, casting can become more complicated. With the right equipment and the proper technique, however, a blustery forecast can be easily conquered. Casting in Windy Conditions Casting into or against the wind is a tiresome task. Fortunately, the beats at Kau Tapen, on the upper river, and Villa Maria, on the lower, have enough water on both banks that you can generally switch sides when needed, keeping the gusts at your back, rather than in your face. Because the wind here comes predominantly from the west, it follows the river corridor downstream, which benefits right-handed casters when it comes to both distance and presentation. But while the river meanders from left to right, leaving fishy cutbank pools at every turn, there will inevitably be occasions when the wind works against you.   Being able to switch from right- to left-handed casting helps minimize problems. Another tip to consider: Keep your backcast low, and finish with the forward stroke high. A shorter spey rod or a switch rod helps with the latter by allowing for more compact D-loops, and more consistent anchor placements. A slow, wide D-loop, on the other hand, gives the wind more time and space to blow the line away, with can compromise your cast/presentation. For me, the ideal spey rod for windy conditions will handle a compact, slightly overweight shooting head that doesn’t give the wind time to mess everything up. Rods between 11 and 13 feet work great. A deep-loading, quickly recovering 7- or 8-weight is my preferred rod of choice, matched either with a short Scandi shooting head for normal conditions, […]

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You’re gotta see it to believe it!

For several years now, we at Nervous Waters Fly Fishing have been expounding the virtues of fishing one of the world’s greatest ecological water systems ——-The Ibera Marshlands of Argentina.  The expanse of this mostly unexplored area is hard to imagine.  An area consisting of 3,000,000 acres, an area of more than 4,600 square miles, an area 4 times larger than the entire state of Rhode Island.  This virtually untapped fishing paradise is made up of crystal clear rivers, lakes, marshes and lagoons.  It is here where you will find what is arguably the hardest fighting and most beautiful fresh water fish species in all the world- the Golden Dorado.  This is where Nervous Waters Fly Fishing built it’s spectacular PIRA LODGE. The following article was written by Kate Fensterstock for TODAY’S FLYFISHER magazine.  Kate came to PIRA LODGE to experience the beauty of the Ibera Marshlands and experience it’s spectacular Golden Dorado fishing.  We hope you enjoy the following and invite you to experience PIRA LODGE for yourself. Read the article

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How to shoot the perfect hero shot

How to Hero Shot by Stephan  Dombaj You travel halfway around the globe to explore the best fishing waters in Argentina, so don’t settle for a lame photo to commemorate a great fish. More than 36,000 years ago, successful hunters in Spain dragged their kills back to their dark caves and then painted elaborate murals to immortalize their feats. And while the Cave of Altamira, in Cantabria, may not be the oldest account of polychromatic hunting scene imagery, it’s certainly is one of the most famous. Ancient evidence that that the hero shot has deep roots! In this the day and age of affordable digital cameras and high-rez cell phones, capturing a great moment is a little easier applying charcoal to a rock wall. But still, a lot can go wrong. Presenting a fish correctly for the camera can be troubling for some anglers. (And, if not done correctly, for the fish too.) Here are a few simple tips from the Fly Fishing Nation crew that’ll get you the be-all and end-all hero shot you want. Just keep in mind that not every fish needs a picture. Trust me.   Prepare the camera Check battery/memory card (Seriously, you guys can’t even imagine how often people snap away with no memory cards in the camera.) Keep the fish wet Keep the fish sideways in the net while preparing the shot. Dip it into the water in-between the images, let it breath. Do not expose the fish to air for too long. Rule of thumb is less than 10 seconds. Ten seconds can be a long time when you’re gasping for air, so try to keep it as short as humanly possible. While it doesn’t take a good man to be a good sportsman, it certainly is one of the ground rules […]

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A Golden Opportunity

A Golden Opportunity story Kathryn Fensterstock photos Fly Fishing Nation Angler Kate Fensterstock recently joined us at Pira Lodge, in the Ibera Marsh. Here, in the pages of Country & Town House magazine, she recounts her breathtaking transformation from chalkstream trout chaser to jungle dorado huntress.   Read the article

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Welcome to Suindá Lodge, on the remote Upper Paraná River

Starting in January 2019, Nervous Waters will officially open its newly built Suindá Lodge. Suindá is a dorado-fisher’s dream, strategically located near the town of Itatí, in the province of Corrientes. The region houses one of the most productive sections on the Upper Paraná River, a clear-water fishery that consistently kicks out good numbers of large dorado. Its secret lies in its structure: generally fast-flowing runs, coursing over beautiful rock gardens. You’ll also sight-fish sandbank zones, where, when the conditions are right, colossal dorado hunt sabalo baitfish that seasonally congregate in big schools. Great fishing awaits you at Suindá. You’ll also find incredible dining and lodging. Suindá’s deluxe wood-structure living quarters are perched on a high bluff for breathtaking views of the sprawling river and its wild, jungle-like surroundings. The remote riverfront property includes four spacious, two-bedroom “cabañas”, with private bathrooms. Wooden footbridges connect each room to the main dining hall. From there, it’s a short walk to the river, where your expert guides and their state-of-the-art boats are waiting. The Itatí section of the Paraná marks part of the border between Argentina and Paraguay. New 21-foot Marsopa boats, with 150HP, 4-stroke Yamahas, and front and back fishing platforms. Grand-slam diversity with resident pirá pita (Brycon orbignyanus) and pacú (Colossoma mitrei). The river flows clear along fishy banks, sandbars, boulder-gardens, and islands that create deltas and smaller riachos (streams). One-hour nonstop flights are available from Buenos Aires Aeroparque Domestic Airport (AEP) to Corrientes (CNQ) or Resistencia (RES) airports on a daily schedule. The two neighboring airports are located 40 minutes from each other by car. Suindá will house eight anglers (max capacity) for its inaugural season beginning on Jan. 1. Book your trip today and be one of the first to explore this remarkable dorado fishery.

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Gold Rush

Gold Rush story Kathryn Fensterstock photos Fly Fishing Nation   Be sure to check out the new issue of DUN Magazine for its colorful feature story on Pira Lodge, in the Ibera Marsh. The piece, entitled “Gold Rush”, details the great dorado fishing in the region. Plus it’s jam packed with stunning shots.   “Quietly crawling through marshland with my rod balanced on my shoulder and doing my best to stay out of sight, I was reminded of stalking chalk stream trout in the British countryside, not a technique I had anticipated when fishing for the aggressive golden dorado in the Ibera Marsh of Northern Argentina. But, I was in fact after salminus brasiliensis, and this morning’s delicate roll casting in the small and intricate channels of the marshland was one example of how golden dorado fishing constantly keeps an angler on their toes, trying new techniques in varied environments”. READ THE WHOLE ARTICLE

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Top Flies for Rio Grande Trout… And How To Fish ’Em

By S. Dombaj and T. Burrell Argentina’s Rio Grande and its Rio Menendez tributary are home to healthy returns of migrating trout that can reach near-mythical proportions. In order to turn lore into reality, preparation is key. In this short series of articles, we intend to help you do just that by sharing tips and tricks—from our guide staff, as well as accomplished Rio Grande anglers—that will help you succeed. Let’s start by looking inside the fly box. Flies, in all their glorious varieties, are designed to deceive fish by imitating a known food source or by provoking a territorial response. Some, of course, work better than others—and this is absolutely true on the Rio Grande, where over the years we’ve fine-tuned our “ammo” to best suit our quarry. Here are 5 highly effective patterns that will surely turn your fishing guide into your best friend for a day, or a week. 1) Metal Detector Intruder Intruders have become undeniably popular in the Pacific Northwest over the past decade. Designed to be swung across the river, they combine fast-sinking design elements and a great silhouette with the benefits of short-shank stinger hooks. The abbreviated shank doesn’t provide the exuberant leverage of a longer shank, hence more twisting and turning fish will stay on once buttoned-up. Favorite color variations for the Rio Grande and the Menendez include Black/Chartreuse, Blue/Chartreuse, Black/Silver, or simply chartreuse. They are great flies for when the river blows out, when something that pushes a lot of water is required. Heavier versions are also a good choice for when the fish stack up in deeper pools.   Presentation: Depending on the water level, all line types apply. Mostly fished on a floating head with a heavy sink-tip. Cast down and across the pool, at a 70° angle. Let […]

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Comfort Meets Premium Tent-Camp Adventure – Argentina

  Multi-night floats on Patagonia’s A-List trout streams are a must-do for serious trout fishers. And Patagonia River Guide’s “Unplugged” camp options are at the top of the bucket list. You’ll fish for large trout on miles of unpressured water, on quintessential rivers such as the Limay or Medio. Then at day’s end, you’ll relax by a roaring campfire, while enjoying fine wine and great food. Northern Patagonia Lodge Northern Patagonia Lodge is surrounded by prime fishing opportunities. In addition to the Chimehuin, you’ll target the Collon Cura and Aluminé rivers, as well as trophy lakes such as Huechulafquen, Paimún, Tromen, and Curruhe. On the water, the renowned PRG guide team will show you the way. Off of it, it’s all about the Nervous Waters experience: ultimate service and accommodations, plus excellent cuisine and a full selection of Argentina’s best wines back at the lodge. Unplugged Camps PRG specializes in overnight camp trips on the Caleufu, Aluminé and Limay Medio rivers. And guests choosing to “unplug” will enjoy long, incredible fishing days. This 2-night Unplugged camp is truly deluxe and includes a high level of service, plus surprising amenities. Guests enjoy spacious tents outfitted with comfortable beds, one for each angler in double occupancy. Beds are furnished with fine cotton linen, warm comforters, and down pillows. Camps are also fully catered and include a professional chef to prepare gourmet meals.   CONTACT US TODAY FOR DATES AND DETAILS

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